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Robin Williams Had ‘Serious Money Troubles’ In Months Before His Death, Claims Friend — Was The Pressure Too Much?

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Aug. 12 2014, Updated 6:49 a.m. ET

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Robin Williams' tragic death at age 63 came as a shock to the world who knew him only as a lovable comic figure. But a source close to the Mrs. Doubtfire star tells RadarOnline.com that in addition to his addiction struggle, the actor recently confided to a family friend that he had "serious money troubles," and was worried about his family’s financial security.

According to a family friend who had spoken to Williams recently, "All he could talk about were serious money troubles. There were clearly other issues going on and Robin sounded distant during the telephone conversation. Robin was known for being so generous to his friends and family during the height of his success, and would help anyone out that needed it."

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"There was also frustration that Robin expressed at having to take television and movie roles he didn't want to take, but had to for the paycheck,” the source said, referencing his recently announced decision to film Mrs. Doubtfire 2. "Doing sequels was never Robin's thing, and he wasn't that excited at having to reprise the role of Mrs. Doubtfire, which was scheduled to start filming later this year.”

He also recently worked on Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb, the third installment in that franchise.

In addition, Williams revealed in a Parade Magazine  interview last year, that he took a role on the now-defunct CBS show The Crazy Ones because he needed the paycheck.

"The idea of having a steady job is appealing," Williams told the magazine. "There are bills to pay. My life has downsized, in a good way.”

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"I'm selling the ranch up in Napa,” he said of his $35 million Villa Sorriso. "I just can't afford it anymore."

Though Williams had one of Hollywood’s most enduring careers, divorce — from first wife Valerie Velardi in 1988, and from second wife, Marsha Garces in 2008 — had gutted his bank account.

"Divorce is expensive,” he recently said. "I used to joke they were going to call it 'all the money', but they changed it to 'alimony'. It's ripping your heart out through your wallet.”

With financial pressures weighing, the insider said that the cancellation of The Crazy Ones in May sent him spiraling.

"Robin slipped into a deep depression,” the source said. “He felt embarrassed and humiliated that the show had been a failure. It was very hard for Robin to accept. Here he was in his sixties, and forced to take a role on television for the money. It's just not where he thought he would be at this point in his life."

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Williams is survived by third wife, Susan Schneider, and three children, Zachary Pym, 31, from his first wife, Velardi, daughter, Zelda, 25, and son, Cody, 25, from his second marriage to Garces.

If anyone you know, is struggling with thoughts of suicide, please immediately seek help. You can speak with a skilled, trained counselor at a national Suicide Prevention Lifeline crisis center in your area, anytime 24/7 — call 1-800-273-TALK (8255).

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