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EXCLUSIVE: Musician Who Released 'I Wanna Shoot Lady Gaga' Song Should 'Apologize;' Anti-Gun Lobby

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Jan. 13 2011, Published 6:15 a.m. ET

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Sabrina is already receiving backlash for a song in which she talks about shooting Lady Gaga – and the Coalition to Stop Gun Violence thinks she should apologize for the song.

Listen To ‘I Wanna Shoot Lady Gaga’

“You would hope that the person that put it out the song would recant it and apologize,” Communications Director Ladd Everitt of the CSGV told RadarOnline.com in an exclusive interview.

“The problem right now, and we saw this in Arizona, is that when you have that out in popular culture you can get someone who’s severely deranged or unstable who has access to guns and then we have a tragedy on our hands.”

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As RadarOnline.com revealed, Sabrina wrote a blog on sohh.com addressing the song and the meaning behind it.

"My song I Wanna Shoot Lady Gaga is not about shooting Stefani Germanotta, the lonely, insecure girl better known to the world as her alter ego, Lady Gaga. The song is about killing off the gimmick, the character of Lady Gaga,” she wrote.

“It's not meant to be sadistic or evil, I mean, just check out the song's artwork… I want to kill everything she represents and stands for.”

However, the lyrics to her song seem to sing a different tune.

“Shoot, shoot, shoot, just shoot Lady Gaga,” Sabrina sings in the song while also calling the 24-year-old “crazy.”

“Take the boom and the bullet goes zoom…to her temple of doom and we zap her to the moon…she can cherry boom boom and there’s blood on her costume.”

Everitt told RadarOnline.com that the effects of violent lyrics such as those can go unnoticed until it’s too late and that artists have a responsibility to the general public.

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“I think they have a huge effect and America is the pop culture epicenter of the world,” Everitt said.

“When you hear that stuff, it gets out to everyone. When you speak you need to be cognizant of your audience, and when you’re a recording artist, you have a very broad audience.

“The danger is that some people might not understand the meaning behind it. And then of course there’s children who hear those things and they’re not mentally capable yet of understanding the deeper meaning and take it at face value.

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