Sony CEO Michael Lynton Slams Middle East Peace Talks In Leaked Emails: 'Let Them All Kill Each Other!' PLUS Secret Chats With State Department

Sony CEO Michael Lynton Israel Palestine Emails WikiLeaks

Apr. 17 2015, Updated 10:35 a.m. ET

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When WikiLeaks Editor in Chief Julian Assange posted a massive collection of hacked Sony emails on Thursday, he explained that they show the workings of a corporation "at the centre of a geo-political conflict." Indeed, RadarOnline.com can exclusively report that the leaked emails reveal extensive communication between SONY CEO Michael Lynton and the US State Department. And it wasn't just business: Lynton was not shy about sharing his political beliefs via his work email. In one communication, Lynton bashes the Middle Eastern peace process and sniffs, "Let them all kill each other!"

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The disturbing email came as a response to an October 2014 article by Fareed Zakaria in The Washington Post regarding President Barack Obama's foreign policy in Syria. A relative had forwarded it to Lynton with the comment, "Brilliant."

"Face it the entire thing is a gigantic mess," Lynton wrote. "And if it were not for Israel, we would let them all kill each other and wait for the dust to settle."

"We don't need the oil, and I am not sure it is worth the time or effort to try and broker the nations at the edge," he continued. "It is a dog's breakfast plain and simple and I am not sure there is any role for America here."

"On reflection," Lynton said, "Israel may be in the catbird seat. Let them all kill each other around the Jewish state and pick up the pieces after they have exhausted themselves."

Lynton's emails also show his active participation in both social and professional events centered around pro-Israel policy.

In August, 2013, he RSVP'd yes to "an intimate salon-style discussion" at Natalie Portman's home regarding the Israeli conflict and hosted by J Street President Jeremy Ben-Ami. J Street bills itself as "The Political Home for Pro-Israel, Pro-Peace Americans."

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The next day, Portman sent him an email with links to websites that contain "accurate Israel and world Jewry journalism."

Just a few months later, in February, 2014, Lynton RSVP'd yes to an "intimate dinner" at Israeli producer Arnon Milchan's home with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Lynton's pro-Israel personal beliefs and connections translated to political influence at least once. A June 2014 exchange between Lynton, Under-Secretary of State For Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs Richard Stengel, and Lynton's assistant David Diamond covered a top-secret joint DC-Hollywood venture that had come from "the secretary's office."

Discussing pulling together several actors including Ben Affleck, Shonda Rhimes, and others for the cause, Lynton chimed in that he "would also include Natalie Portman as she has just done a movie in Israel and is very involved there."

Lynton and Stengel were close confidants on email and also met in person at least once. A December 14, 2014 note from his executive assistant reminded him of a 3 p.m. meeting with the diplomat and the two frequently emailed about planning phone chats and meeting up.

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In one instance, Stengel and Lynton planned to put on a "We Are The World" type of concert for anti-ISIL groups, and even floated the idea of Cat Stevens or Muslim hip hop groups as headliners.

As Radar reported, 30,287 documents from Sony Pictures Entertainment and 173,132 emails related to more than 2,200 emails were published on the notorious file sharing site Thursday.

The company had first been hacked in November 2014, allegedly in response to the debut of North Korea satire flick The Interview.

Story developing.

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