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O.J. Simpson Shocker: P.I. Claims His Son Jason Committed Murders

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Apr. 1 2012, Published 11:00 a.m. ET

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By Radar Staff

Private investigator William Dear has penned a new book with the stunning allegation that Jason Simpson, not his father O.J., murdered Nicole Brown Simpson and Ron Goldman on June 12, 1994.

In O.J. Is Innocent And I Can Prove It, Dear says he's spent the last six years investigating the case.

Dear claims O.J. was at the murder scene but not until after his ex-wife and her friend had been stabbed to death, and that he uncovered substantial circumstantial evidence pointing to Jason being the killer.

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That "evidence" came from an abandoned storage locker and Jason's trash, Dear writes. Two years ago, the Texas gumshoe made the same allegations in a little-seen documentary.

O.J. Simpson was acquitted of the murders in what many viewed as the "trial of the century."  He was later found "liable" for the deaths in a civil suit brought against him by the Brown and Goldman families.

The former football great is now in a Nevada prison, serving a lengthy sentence for armed robbery and kidnapping following his conviction in a bizarre case involving his own sports memorabilia.

LAPD detectives determined Jason Simpson had an alibi at the time of his stepmother's murder and he was never considered a suspect. Now 41, he was last known to be working as a chef in Miami and has not been reached by media outlets seeking comment on the book.

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