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Charles Manson's Pen Pal Demands Grandson Undergo DNA Test

Dec. 14 2018, Published 7:26 p.m. ET

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Michael Channels, Charles Manson’s long-time pen pal, is asking a judge to order former MMA fighter Jason Freeman to take a DNA test to prove he is cult leader's biological grandson, RadarOnline.com exclusively reported.

Freeman, who appeared at Los Angeles Superior Court on Friday, December 14, told the judge he would not voluntarily submit to the DNA test.

As Radar readers know, Channels and Freeman have been embroiled in a legal battle over Manson's estate, which would include items recently recovered from Concoran State Prison where Manson spent over four decades until his death on Nov. 19, 2017.

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Manson, who was 83, died of acute cardiac arrest and other complications.

The Helter Skelter cult mastermind was found guilty of orchestrating the murders of actress Sharon Tate and eight other victims in a 1969 crime spree that shocked the nation.

In court documents, Freeman maintains he should be the rightful heir to the estate as the son of Charles Manson, Jr., who died on June 29, 1993 from an apparent self-inflicted gun shot wound.

Meanwhile, Channels filed in court what he claims is Manson's Last Will and Testament, which was signed on Feb. 14, 2002. In that Will, Manson reportedly wrote he disinherited his two sons, Michael Brunner and Charles Manson, Jr., and wanted all of his estate to go to Channels, including the rights to his image, music and future projects related to his life.

After Friday's hearing, Freeman told Radar that he has "no time" to take a DNA test, but would be willing to do so if ordered by the court.

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"There are some people in the other team who are trying to build their case against me for quite some time and for some reason they think in their minds that an DNA test would prove something different," Freeman, 43, said. "If the DNA isn't a match, it doesn't take away that he was the man I've known all of my life as my grandfather. It doesn't take away the fact that Charles Manson, Jr., my father, took his life, or was murdered. If the courts want me to take a DNA test and that is an obligation, I have no problem with that, but I am not going to do for that individual. I don't have time for that."

Attorney Dale Kiken, who is acting as an administrator of the estate for Freeman, told the court on Friday that he was able to retrieve Manson's possessions from prison. Kiken said he believes the inventory list that he received from prison authorities was not accurate, and it would take some time to assess the value of the various items.

The judge ordered both sides to return to court on June 21 so they could possibly discuss the next steps to take concerning Manson's personal belongings, as well as Channel's motion for a DNA test, which has yet to be filed.

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On Friday, the judge also handed Channel's attorney, Theodore Theodosiadis, a copy of records that Theodosiadis requested from the California Department of Corrections, which could include Manson's probation reports, notification of death, seniors illnesses, or injuries and a case summary from Manson's central file. A protective order was placed on these records, according to an affidavit filed on Nov. 20, 2018.

Alan Davis, the attorney representing Kiken, told Radar that he has not seen the items that were retrieved from the prison, but added there are "boxes and boxes" of Manson's belongings.

"One of the things we have to do now is to find out what's in there and how much its worth," Davis said.

Freeman, who owns a construction company in Florida and also teaches martial arts, told Radar exclusively that he is "taking things in stride" and is leaning on his Christian faith and prayer to get him through the legal battle ahead.

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"It's almost like I didn't even have a chance to mourn his death because there was so much going on," Freeman said. "There are people out there who follow and love my grandfather for one reason, but that's different from why I love him as his grandson. I didn't expect my grandfather to pass away, but I can say now, a year later after his death, that I am more relaxed. This experience is making me grow in life more than I expected."

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