Get Your Fresh Intelligence Daily

SUBMIT

Feds ‘Giving Up’ On Search For Missing Jayme Closs: ‘The Case Is Going Cold’

//jayme closs case federal agents pulling out search pp
Source: Barron County Sheriff’s Department

Nov. 12 2018, Updated 6:13 p.m. ET

Link to FacebookShare to TwitterShare to Email

Just days before the one-month anniversary of 13-year-old Jayme Closs’ disappearance, authorities at the federal level are pulling resources, a source close to the investigation exclusively told RadarOnline.com.

“It’s been about thirty days and we still don’t have much – if anything at all – to work with,” a source told Radar Wednesday. “You have a missing girl who vanished after the execution-style murder of her parents in a secluded town with no surveillance, no eye witnesses and hardly and trail to follow.”

Article continues below advertisement

Closs disappeared during the late hours of Oct. 15 when her parents were shot to death in what investigators call an “execution-style murder.”

Closs’ father was gunned down in the doorway of his home and his wife allegedly barricaded herself in the bathroom, neighbors told Radar.

The insider provided Radar with two working theories on the case. One included that the teen was “catfished” by an online predator and the second being that the innocent child was murdered after the assailant realized that the media attention was “eerily similar” to the disappearance of Mollie Tibbetts over the summer.

“There is reason to believe that Jayme was utilizing a social media app to vent to a boy,” the source told Radar. “However, the so-called ‘boy’ could’ve wound up being a crazed kidnapper preying on the teenage girl, using her own words to build a sick plot to abduct her, murdering anyone who dared cross him. The initial theory that is still a working theory is that Jayme was ‘catfished.’”

The source also noted that it is likely that the Jayme’s home was hit by an assailant who didn’t expect the 13-year-old to be home.

Article continues below advertisement

“On the other hand, the assailant could be someone who hit the wrong home in a failed burglary or hit the right home but didn’t realize the homeowners had a child,” the source continued. “The suspect may have Jayme – alive – but in cases such as that, the extensive media coverage could put her in grave danger.”

Despite the theories, the federal government is slowly pulling resources out of the picture.

“When this case first started, there were agents from all 50 states and 100 cities across the nation,” the source noted. “This investigation had resources from across the nation and at this point the government didn’t get what they expected so the call came from Washington to slowly pull out.”

The source noted that the cars of interest initially released by authorities have been ruled out.

“Police received countless tips on the cars presented during the news conference but lately they have been simply turning away tips regarding those vehicles,” the source continued, noting that the cars are not as crucial as they first believed. “This area is so rural – so isolated – that the police at the local level had little to no surveillance to go off of pertaining to any cars.”

Article continues below advertisement

Radar broke the news that police received a chilling tip that helped investigators narrow down on the whereabouts of a potential target late last month.

Sources close to the investigation told Radar that they deployed special agents of the FBI from around the country to help track down the missing 13-year-old.

Weeks ago, RadarOnline discovered that a man was arrested for allegedly breaking into the missing girls’ home and stealing items such as her underwear.

We pay for juicy info! Do you have a story for RadarOnline.com? Email us at tips@radaronline.com, or call us at 800-344-9598 any time, day or night.

Advertisement

© Copyright 2021 Radar Media Group LLC. Radar and RadarOnline are registered trademarks. All Rights Reserved. People may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website. Offers may be subject to change without notice.