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Fakery EXPOSED! Hulk Hogan Testifies Under Oath —'Hogan Knows Best' Was 'Scripted!'

Hulk Hogan Sex Tape Trial Hogan Knows Best Reality TV Fake
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Mar. 8 2016, Updated 9:59 a.m. ET

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Hulk Hogan and his family are hardly Kardashians, but their reality TV show was just as scripted as the notoriously shady Keeping Up with the Kardashians — if not more so! The disgraced wrestler testified under oath yesterday that Hogan Knows Best was heavily "scripted" and manipulated by producers, RadarOnline.com has learned.

Hogan dropped the bombshell while testifying as part of his $100 million lawsuit against Gawker Media, which published clips of a video featuring him having sex with Heather Clem, the wife of his pal Bubba "The Love Sponge" Clem. As attorneys asked him about the period before the 2006 tape was filmed, he began to discuss the notorious reality show, which aired on VH1 from 2005 to 2007.

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Hogan, born Terry Bollea, said he signed up for the show in the hopes of appeasing his then-wife Linda, who he claimed had her sights set on a Hollywood career.

"I thought maybe the show would help our marriage," he confessed. "In my heart I thought it would really help."

However, he soon learned the truth about what he and his family had signed up for.

"I found out very quickly that reality TV is not real TV," he said on the stand in a Florida courtroom. "It's real-like."

Hogan explained how producers pulled the wool over viewers' eyes and how the show really came together behind the scenes.

"They come up for a theme for the show," Hogan explained. "For example, the first week was, 'Hulk Hogan takes his dog to a psychiatrist.' The next week it's 'Hulk Hogan and his family decide to go ride horses in Montana.'"

"They had themes that they would come up with, eight or 10 different shows per series," he said. "And then every day we'd get a sheet and on the top of the sheet It'd say the call time, which means what time you had to be on camera."

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"For each theme, they'd have, 'OK, this morning we want to accomplish this,'" he claimed. "'Before lunch we want to talk about family vacation.'"

"When we put the microphones on, they … would tell us what they wanted us to say: 'How runny the eggs are, we want you to talk about how you're afraid of horses…'"

"I don't think we ever got the OK the first time around and we'd do it two or three times and we'd get into a rhythm," he claimed. "If we missed a point, producers would say, 'OK Nick, you did everything great, but you gotta say you want to ride a horse bareback."

"They actually told us what to say the majority of the time," he claimed. "It was kind of easy … They told us what to say and scripted it out."

But even then what they had taped did not go straight to air without major editing, including voiceovers.

"You had to go to a studio and talk over your own voice," Hogan, 62, said. "Even if everything was recorded perfectly, you still had to go watch yourself on a screen and talk over yourself."

While Hogan seemed to have no shame discussing his reality TV trickery, he said later in the trial that the leak of his sex tape left him utterly "humiliated," to say nothing of RadarOnline.com's exclusive report about the N-word rant that appeared elsewhere on that tape.

Stay tuned to Radar for the latest from the trial.

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