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Russia Once Sent 6,700 Prisoners To Their Deaths In Real-Life 'Hunger Games'

Russia Sent 6,700 Men To Their Death In Real-Life 'Hunger Games'
Source: Mega

Apr. 18 2022, Published 12:15 p.m. ET

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Former Russian President Joseph Stalin once ordered nearly 7,000 prisoners to an isolated Siberian island without food or shelter in an experiment that ultimately went tragically wrong, Radar has learned.

In a horrifying development that gives Vladimir Putin a run for his money, Stalin reportedly ordered 6,700 prisoners to Nazinsky Island in May 1933 to build a labor camp – but within days of their arrival, the prisoners reportedly started murdering each other and even going so far as to eat each other’s dead bodies.

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Russia Sent 6,700 Men To Their Death In Real-Life 'Hunger Games'
Source: Mega

That is the frightening revelation from a recent Daily Star report that claims of the 6,700 men sent to the island, only 2,000 survived the failed Russian experiment in social engineering and self-sufficiency.

Making the outlet’s report even more harrowing is the fact that those prisoners who attempted to escape the barbaric conditions would be shot down by armed guards stationed on Nazinsky Island and ordered to patrol and keep an eye on the starving inmates.

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Russia Sent 6,700 Men To Their Death In Real-Life 'Hunger Games'
Source: Mega

Within days, any concept of law and order completely broke down, and the nearly 7,000 men were left to their own volition as Stalin’s very own Hunger Games began.

The guards also reportedly turned a blind eye to the many murders that took place on the island, then, when hearing that many of the prisoners resulted to cannibalism because they were without any other source of food, the guards reportedly started rounding up the alleged cannibals and executing them.

Not even one month after the experiment began, Stalin was forced to end the atrocious experiment because in just a few short weeks, 2,000 men had died from either starvation, disease or murder, and another 2,000 reportedly disappeared without a trace.

"The things we saw! People were dying everywhere; they were killing each other,” one eyewitness told the human rights group Memorial in 1988, 53 years after the initial experiment and marking the first-time evidence that the study ever took place came to light.

Russia Sent 6,700 Men To Their Death In Real-Life 'Hunger Games'
Source: Mega

"People caught a girl, tied her to a poplar tree, cut off her breasts, her muscles, everything they could eat, everything, everything,” the eyewitness continued. “They were hungry, they had to eat."

Now, nearly 90 years after the horrors took place on the island since nicknamed “Death Island,” the land remains uninhabited except for a small cross meant to acknowledge the disturbing event that took place there.

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