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Arkansas Cops Blast Duggars Over Josh Molestation Report Leak Lawsuit

Jul. 10 2017, Published 10:38 a.m. ET

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Arkansas police are furious with the Duggar family, RadarOnline.com can reveal.

The officials are demanding that a lawsuit brought against them by the scandal plagued reality family be tossed out of court.

Jill, Jessa, Jinger and Joy Duggar, are being targeted by the police for wasting both tax-payers money and time over their suit.

The family filed a suit against city of Springdale, Arkansas, In Touch magazine and police officials, over the release of investigative reports relating to their brother Josh molesting his sisters.

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Their lawsuit explained the Duggar sisters spoke to investigators back in 2006. The police promised the girls – all minors at the time – that any statements would not be made public and only circulated with police and child service officials.

However around 2015, In Touch Magazine filed a FOIA request with the Arkansas police seeking the investigation records. The department granted their request and released the records to the tabloid who then went on to publish at least 8 stories on the molestation investigation.

As a result the Duggar sisters argued that under Arkansas law the police are prohibited from releasing information related to cases of sexual misconduct to children.

They claimed that they were victimized by the reports - which ultimately led to the cancellation of their show 19 Kids And Counting.

However, the city of Springdale, Arkansas and police chief Kathy O'Kelley fired back at the Duggar sisters lawsuit demanding it be thrown out.

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She argued that around May 2015 an attorney faxed over a FOIA request to the Springdale Police Department requesting a broad range of documents related to the investigation of Josh Duggar.

After consulting with the Washington County Juvenile Prosecuting Attorney and Department of Human Services, the officials determined the police report with redaction's throughout of names and identifying information of any minors, must be released.

Officials claim that before the release of the redacted police report In Touch Weekly was already publishing stories regarding allegations in the report.

"There is no liability when the defendant merely gives further publicity to information about the plaintiff which is already public. Thus there is no liability for giving publicity to facts about the plaintiff's life which are matters of public record."

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Furthermore, they state: "The protection against public dissemination of information is limited and extends only to highly personal matters representing "the most intimate aspects of human affairs."

They argue that the Duggar sisters have failed to prove that the Springdale defendants intentionally invaded their constitutional right to privacy.

The fact that they redacted the report shows the opposite of what the family are stating in that they tried to remove sensitive information.

Additionally, they state that the Duggars own revelations in the media further compromise their case.

"Further, Plaintiffs' notoriety is clear from the Complaint, from the discussion of their television show to mention of online blogs dedicated or concerned with their public identity. Such public notoriety indicates that Plaintiffs cannot establish that the redacted Springdale Police Report was not a matter of legitimate public concern."

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