Tiger Woods Agent: Paper ‘Falsely Reported’ Doc’s Connection To Golfer

Tiger Woods‘ agent, Mark Steinberg, slammed a New York Times article on Tuesday that might have planted seeds the golfer’s alleged cheating wasn’t limited to just the bedroom.

The Times article connected Woods to Dr. Anthony Galea, a Canadian doctor under FBI investigation for accusations he was providing athletes with performance-enhancing drugs. Woods had received a blood-spinning method called platelet-rich plasma therapy from Galea at his Isleworth, Florida home on four occasions (in February and March of 2009), after he was slow to heal from a June 2008 knee surgery, the Times reported.

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“The treatment Tiger received is a widely-accepted therapy, and to suggest some connection with illegality is recklessly irresponsible” Steinberg said in a statement. “The New York Times is flat wrong, no one at IMG has ever met or recommended Dr. Galea, nor were we worried about the progress of Tiger’s recovery, as the Times falsely reported.”

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Galea, according to the paper, was taken into custody October 15 in Toronto by Canadian police, after he was found carrying human growth hormone (HGH) and Actovegin in his bag at the border of the U.S. and Canada in September.

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Within the golf community, the PGA Tour’s executive vice president of communications and international affairs, Ty Vota, did not seem overly concerned over the story.

“We have read nothing in the published articles about Dr. Galea that would suggest a violation of our anti-doping policy as it relates to Tiger Woods and Dr. Galea,” he told the Orlando Sentinel.

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