Jennifer Aniston Prepares For A Single Future With Amazing New Bachelorette Pad

Jennifer Aniston has spent the past two and a half years pouring her sweat blood and tears into the renovation of her new Beverly Hills home. The stunning house is now completed and Aniston is showcasing the finished project in the March issue of Architectural Digest.

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Judging by her amazing new pad Aniston seems set on the future as a single independent woman, modeling her house accordingly – even going so far as to modify the master bathroom to be more conducive to the solo life than coupledom.

“[The house] originally had his-and-hers baths, but Aniston has turned the ‘his’ into a spa bath with a soaking tub,” the magazine reports.

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But, although Aniston has designed the complex high-tech home to fit with her single status, it doesn’t mean she plans to spend lonely nights alone. In fact, the Zen-inspired space has been built with entertaining in mind, with a dining room that seats 24, along with an antique gong that summons diners and a huge gadget packed kitchen perfect for rustling up dinner for friends.

A select few lucky friends have already gotten to enjoy some Aniston hospitality, the actress has already hosted several A-list parties, including a star studded housewarming and a 100+ guest holiday party in December.

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Aniston says that the house “vibrates with the love that created it”. And, “I am so proud of this house. And I want to celebrate the people who made it: the master craftsmen who poured so much of themselves into its creation.” That includes the designer, Stephen Shadley, who worked closely with her throughout the project, “I’ll be lucky if I ever do anything with this kind of team and freedom again,” raves Shadley. “It was a project without a problem.”

To get a peak at Aniston’s amazing new luxurious bachelorette pad, or should we say mansion, check out the March issue of Architectural Digest, on stands now.

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